65% of Registered Cinematic Work in South Korea Classified Hardcore Porn

Michael Song, Oct. 9, 2015, 9:49 a.m.


It turns out that 65 percent of the cinematographic work registered with the Korea Copyright Commission was hardcore porn, barely related to art or creativity. According to a report issued by the Korea Copyright Commission, 65 percent (1,600 cases) of the registered cinematographic work had titles that indicated appearances of children and teenagers, rape, incest and other crimes.

Among the 626 pieces registered in 2013, there were no hardcore porn or X-rated movies.  There was a slight increase to 271 pieces last year (11.9 percent), before the sudden explosion this year.

The results of the report are expected to be controversial, since producing, distributing and even possessing pornographic materials that include children is strictly banned by the UN.

According to the children and young boys and girls sex protection law, those who produce or import pornography starring children or teenagers should be subject to life imprisonment or imprisonment over five years. In addition, selling, lending, distributing and/or providing child porn for commercial purposes, or possessing, transporting, exhibiting and screening child porn is punishable by up to 10 years in prison.

However, the rules of copyright registration at the Korea Copyright Commission stipulate that officials do not investigate whether a specific piece is pornographic or not. Officials say that they do not look into the contents, as there is a possibility that controversy over the freedom of expression and creativity might occur.

Governor Park Joo-sun, who is in charge of the matter, says that protecting the freedom of expression doesn’t mean that child porn should be registered without investigation. The Supreme Court has also decided that pornography that distorts humanity has no value in protecting.

 

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